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Tag Archive | "Muslim Women"

A Manual On Rights Of Women Under Islam

Sunday, December 29, 1996

Towards Global Feminism: A Muslim Perspective

Monday, July 1, 1996

In Radically Speaking: Feminism Reclaimed / edited by Diane Bell and Renate Klein (eds.) The virtue of the global position is that it partakes of the wisdom of all cultures and that it accommodates differences in the levels of economic and social development without succumbing to either the normlessness of cultural relativism or the self-righteous parochialism of any particular culture.

Women’s Rights Gaining Attention Within Islam

Thursday, May 16, 1996

The New York Times / By Barbara Crossette / Also in Persian Individuals and women’s rights groups are applying pressure for change. They want the right to education, both secular and religious; they seek changes in economic practices to allow women to own and inherit property; they also want reform in Muslim family laws that often leave women at the mercy of men.

Prose, Politics and Power: Conversations with Muslim Women Leaders

Sunday, May 12, 1996

Sisterhood Is Global Institute Muslim women leaders discuss fiction in Muslim-majority societies as capable of creating a room for dialogue, for subversion and for empowerment. They reflect on the example of Scheherazade, and the richness and variety of the legacy in Islam.

Muslim Women’s Rights Leaders Speak: “Beijing and Beyond”

Saturday, May 11, 1996

George Washington University “Women’s rights are human rights”. Muslim women humanitarians have a history of networking and working to enrich the conditions of women worldwide. Sections of this film come from the world conference “Beijing and Beyond – Implementing the Platform in Muslim Societies” organized by the Sisterhood Is Global Institute.

Claiming Our Rights:

Monday, January 1, 1996

A Manual for Women's Human Rights Education in Muslim Societies 1996 / Sisterhood Is Global Institute / Bethesda, MD Co-authored with Haleh Vaziri; Published in Arabic, Azeri, Bangla, English, Hindi, Malay, Persian, Russian, Urdu and Uzbek; Introduction available online. "A manual that, unlike traditional human rights law, reconceives rights as also relevant in religious and cultural spheres, not just in the public sphere." - Madhavi Sunder, The Yale Law Journal It is only when women reclaim their own cultures, interpreting texts and traditions in self-empowering ways, that women may truly claim...

Claiming Our Rights: Introduction

Monday, January 1, 1996

The purpose of this human rights education manual is to facilitate transmission of the universal human rights concepts inscribed in the major international documents to grass roots populations in Muslim societies. The manual seeks to enable grass roots populations to convey universal concepts in association with indigenous ideas, traditions, myths, and texts rendered in local idiom. It aims to empower grassroots women to articulate and demand their human rights through interactive communication at home and through the political process in the community and society.

Voice of Conscience: Impassioned Author Lobbies for Rights of Muslim Women

Friday, June 23, 1995

The Jewish Exponent / By Marilyn Silverstein Mahnaz Afkhami shares a certain sisterhood with the Queen of Hearts in Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland -- a woman who thought nothing of believing as many as six impossible things before breakfast. "To believe the impossible is possible is the first step in making it so," said Afkhami, executive director of the Sisterhood Is Global Institute in Bethesda, Md.

Faith and Freedom:

Sunday, January 1, 1995

Women's Human Rights in the Muslim World 1995 / Syracuse University Press and I.B. Tauris / Edited "A gripping combination of serious scholarship and popularising" - MESA Bulletin Faith and Freedom is the first detailed study to emphasize Muslim women's rights as human rights and to explore the existing patriarchal structures and processes that present women's human rights as contradictory to Islam. Academics and activists, most of whom live in the Muslim world, discuss the major issues facing women of the region as they enter the twenty-first century. They demonstrate how the cultural segregation of women, and the monopoly on the interpretation...

Dilemna of Muslim Women’s Human Rights

Sunday, January 1, 1995

“The most taxing contradiction [Muslim women] face casts the demands of living in the contemporary world against the requirements of tradition as determined and advanced by the modern Islamist world view. At the center of this conflict is the dilemna of Muslim women’s human rights – whether Muslim women have rights because they are human […]

About Mahnaz Afkhami

A lifetime advocate for the rights of women, Mahnaz Afkhami works with activists across the world, especially in Muslim majority societies, to help women become leaders. She is Founder and President of Women’s Learning Partnership for Rights, Development, and Peace (WLP), Executive Director of Foundation for Iranian Studies...more

Quotables – Muslim Women

"The most taxing contradiction [Muslim women] face casts the demands of living in the contemporary world against the requirements of tradition as determined and advanced by the modern Islamist world view. At the center of this conflict is the dilemna of Muslim women’s human rights – whether Muslim women have rights because they are human beings, or whether they have rights because they are Muslim" - Faith and Freedom: Introduction

"To the extent that Islam, defined and interpreted by traditionalist "Muslim" men, is allowed to determine the context and contour of the debate on women's rights, women will be on the losing side of the debate because the conclusion is already contained in the premise and reflected in the process. This is the heart of the moral tragedy of Muslim societies in our time." - Gender Apartheid, Cultural Relativism, and Women's Human Rights

“Islam is not the problem. Rather it is the misuse of Islam by interpreting it to fit the needs of the partriarchal order - the powers that be - and the privileges that one gender has held over the other.” - How are women working to eliminate violence against women in Muslim-majority societies?