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Tag Archive | "Iran Women’s Movement"

Shirin Ebadi on Obama and Tehran

Thursday, March 11, 2010

The Economist / By R.L.G. Perhaps the most interesting point from the perspective of American policy is that Shirin Ebadi simply does not think this government can or will negotiate nuclear issues in good faith with America. Mahnaz Afkhami noted that anti-Americanism is one of the few claims on legitimacy the government has left. This is why neither of them thought the Americans should waste time talking about nukes when the government can never agree, and why America should instead focus on supporting the greens.

Interview with Mahnaz Afkhami, the second woman minister in the history of Iran (In Persian)

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

BBC Persian Hardtalk / By Enayat Fani Afkhami looks back on the complex issues of advancing women’s rights in Iran: from her time working as Minister for Women’s Affairs in pre revolutionary Iran, and using economic development goals as a way of advancing the status of women and promoting reform of family law. BBC Persian […]

Women’s Organization of Iran

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

“Now, when I look back [on the work of the WOI], it seems to me that our main mistake was not that we did not do other things which we should have done. Our main mistake was that we created conditions in which the contradictions related to modernity, progress, equality, and human rights, especially women’s […]

Iran’s New Crackdown on Women

Saturday, December 12, 2009

The Daily Beast / By Dana Goldstein Mahnaz Afkhami says that in recent months, the Iranian government has encouraged civil-rights and pro-democracy leaders to emigrate, as an alterative to lengthy imprisonments or executions that could further inflame a restive public. “The idea is to make sure they leave the country. That’s how they become irrelevant actually, relative to the kind of role they can play when they’re inside. ”

Women’s Rights In Iran

Friday, November 27, 2009

PRI's The World / By Marco Werman / Listen Iran’s authorities recently confiscated Shirin Ebadi’s Nobel Peace prize medal. Activists say the move against the Iranian human rights lawyer exemplifies Tehran’s hostility toward women. Mahnaz Afkhami was the Minister for Women’s Affairs in Iran before the 1979 revolution. She now lives in Bethesda, Maryland. Afkhami wrote the foreword to a new book called Iranian Women’s One Million Signatures Campaign for Equality. Anchor Marco Werman talks with Afkhami about the women’s movement in Iran and the ‘One Million Signatures’ campaign.

Iran’s Million Signatures Campaign: A Leading Voice for Democracy

Monday, November 9, 2009

Democracy Digest / By David Lowe The volume is the second in a series of translations brought forth by the Women’s Learning Partnership (WLP), an international organization that actively promotes the rights of women in developing societies. As the WLP’s founder and president Mahnaz Afkhami notes, “In the end, the simple courage and perseverance of women whose peaceful signature-gathering is condemned as a crime against the state reminds us that ideas and beliefs cannot be silenced.”

A Woman For All Seasons (In Persian)

Friday, November 6, 2009

On November 6, Ms. Afkhami was featured on Mehdi Falahati’s Persian-language program “Rou dar Rou” (Face-to-Face), produced by Voice of America. During the interview she discussed her professional journey, as well as the role of women in Iran’s democracy movement and their use of ICTs to take their message to the international community.

Obama, Ahmadinejad, and the Women of Iran

Thursday, October 29, 2009

In the Women's Learning Partnership blog This month, for the first time in 30 years, formal negotiations between the United States and Iran took place in a relatively positive atmosphere. As President Obama had promised during his campaign, dialogue took the place of diatribe. This is an important development.

Iranian Women’s Voices

Monday, October 26, 2009

In The Huffington Post Iranian Women are bringing new support, dynamism and confidence to the global movement for women's rights and human rights, by sharing their experiences via the Internet with women in other Muslim societies, and by documenting their years of dialogue, grassroots activism and refusal to be silenced in a new English translation of the book, Iranian Women's One Million Signatures Campaign for Equality: The Inside Story.

Iran’s One Million Signatures Campaign

Monday, October 26, 2009

“Iran’s One Million Signatures Campaign for the Reform of Discriminatory Laws is an extraordinary phenomenon. It is democratic, nonhierarchical, open, and evolving in a polity that is none of those things.” – Iranian Women’s One Million Signatures Campaign for Equality: The Inside Story, Foreword

About Mahnaz Afkhami

A lifetime advocate for the rights of women, Mahnaz Afkhami works with activists across the world, especially in Muslim majority societies, to help women become leaders. She is Founder and President of Women’s Learning Partnership for Rights, Development, and Peace (WLP), Executive Director of Foundation for Iranian Studies...more

Quotables – Iran Women’s Movement

"Now, when I look back [on the work of the WOI], it seems to me that our main mistake was not that we did not do other things which we should have done. Our main mistake was that we created conditions in which the contradictions related to modernity, progress, equality, and human rights, especially women’s rights, increased and the reaction to our work put perhaps too much pressure on the country’s social fabric." - Fate of the family protection law

"Iran’s One Million Signatures Campaign for the Reform of Discriminatory Laws is an extraordinary phenomenon. It is democratic, nonhierarchical, open, and evolving in a polity that is none of those things." - Iranian Women’s One Million Signatures Campaign for Equality: The Inside Story, Foreword

At the time of her execution, [Ms. Parsay] wrote one of the most moving letters to her children. And in that she expressed the same courage and the same steadfast belief in her principles that she had followed all of her life. And that was that: I’m a doctor. I know what it means to die, that takes only a minute. I’m not afraid of that. What I’m afraid of is to be pressured into denying 50 years of service to women. - Executed But Not Forgotten

“Prostitution was the code word for activism during the early part of the revolution” - I Was Iran's Last Woman Minister