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Tag Archive | "Exile"

Female Scholars in Exile Form Legion of Longing

Monday, January 11, 2010

Women's eNews / By Bijoyeta Das Exiled female writers find they have little in common with immigrants who come to the U.S. seeking material gains. Instead, they are often looking for the chance to find continuity and tell stories about their ruptured lives.

Exile

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

“We have learned first hand that nothing is worth the suffering, death, and destruction brought about by ideologies that in their fervor uproot so much and destroy so many and then fade away, blow up, or self-destruct. We learned in looking back over our lives that nothing is worth the breach of the sanctity of […]

Mahnaz Afkhami & Farah Ebrahimi: Iran

Saturday, October 1, 2005

PBS "Destination America" Sisters Mahnaz and Farah became independent women in America. Both later returned to Iran as adults, where they would be torn apart by Iranian politics during the reign of the shah. Mahnaz became a minister in the shah's government and advocated for women's rights, while Farah and her husband joined the cause of the revolution. Ultimately, Mahnaz and Farah both had to flee Iran in fear for their lives.

PBS Destination America “Mahnaz Afkhami and Farah Ebrahimi”

Friday, April 15, 2005

Ferdows Naficy and her two daughters, Mahnaz and Farah became independent women in America. The PBS program "Destination America" features their story in the episode "Mahnaz Afkhami and Farah Ebrahimi: Iran."

Exiles, Immigrants and Refugees: Women Making Choices

Monday, April 1, 1996

Book review by Ivette Valdés In Feminist Collections, A Quarterly of Women’s Studies Resources, Volume 17, Nos. 3-4, Spring/Summer 1996 Mahnaz Afkhami, WOMEN IN EXILE. Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia, 1994. 210p. $35, ISBN 0-8139-1542-2; pap., $12.95, ISBN 0-8139-1543-0. Jill M. Bystydzienski and Estelle P. Resnik, eds., WOMEN IN CROSS-CULTURAL TRANSITIONS. Bloomington, IN: Phi […]

Allah and Freud are against them: Shusha Guppy is fascinated and saddened by a new survey of Iranian women’s lives

Saturday, August 6, 1994

The Independent / Book Review by Shusha Guppy DURING THE upheavals that led to the 1979 revolution in Iran, women's support is supposed to have been the decisive factor in the overthrow of the Shah and the seizure of power by Ayatollah Khomeini. Every day in the news we saw images of women wrapped in black chador shaking their fists and shrieking slogans, like birds of bad omen in a horror movie. This was all the more astonishing as Iranian women were among the most emancipated in the Islamic world.

Women in Exile: A Prologue

Friday, April 1, 1994

Along with the loss of our culture and home comes the loss of the traditional patriarchal structures that flouted our lives in our own land. The pain of breaking out of our cultural cocoon brings with it the possibility of an expanded universe and a freer, more independent self. We are all "damaged," but we repair ourselves into larger, deeper, more humane personalities. Indeed, the similarities between our lives as women and as women in exiles supersede every other experience we have encountered as members of different countries, classes, cultures, professions, and religions. We echo each other when we say the world is our home and repeat wistfully that it means we have no home. We talk of having gained identification with a more universal cause. We have also learned firsthand that nothing is worth the suffering, death, and destruction brought about by ideologies that in their fervor uproot so much and destroy so many and then fade away, blow up, or self-destruct.

Birds Without Nests

Friday, April 1, 1994

By Nan Levinson Women in Exile, by Mahnaz Afkhami, Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia, 1994, 208 pp., $35.00 hardcover, $12.95 paper. “My earliest memories are of unrest and chaos,” says Ho Ngoc Tran, a doctor, who flees Vietnam in 1978, trusting her life to smugglers with a boat and eventually making her way to […]

Women in Exile

Friday, April 1, 1994

1994 / The University Press of Virginia / Charlottesville, VA Edited and Prologue "a sad, lovely, horrifying, heroic book."-- Women's Review of Books Women in Exile presents an intimate portrait of 13 activist women's flight from oppression, and ...

About Mahnaz Afkhami

A lifetime advocate for the rights of women, Mahnaz Afkhami works with activists across the world, especially in Muslim majority societies, to help women become leaders. She is Founder and President of Women’s Learning Partnership for Rights, Development, and Peace (WLP), Executive Director of Foundation for Iranian Studies...more

Quotables – Exile

"We have learned first hand that nothing is worth the suffering, death, and destruction brought about by ideologies that in their fervor uproot so much and destroy so many and then fade away, blow up, or self-destruct. We learned in looking back over our lives that nothing is worth the breach of the sanctity of an individual’s body and spirit. The sharing of our narratives of exile made us conclude simply that we wish to seek a mildness of manner, a kindness of heart, and a softness of demeanor. We have paid with the days of our lives for the knowledge that nothing good or beautiful can come from harshness and ugliness." - Women in Exile